Archive for the ‘ASR News’ Category

What to do about bats in your rafters

Posted by

Increasingly, bats are choosing to roost in residential properties – old and new – as the number of traditional woodland habitats has fallen. As creatures of habit, they will often return to the same spot time and again.

Wimbledon Common is home to several bat species. While living nearby means that nature really is on your doorstep, if you find the bats have moved closer to your home than you might like, what should you do?

Firstly, it is important to remember that it is rare for bats to cause damage to a home. You may not even notice they are there, especially during the winter months when they are less active, seeking refuge from the weather in roofs and outbuildings while they rear their young.

The problem comes if you wish to sell or renovate your property, as bats are a protected species under UK law. Jack Parker, of Cornerstone Barristers explained: “The legal protection afforded to bats means that it is not only a criminal offence to kill a bat, you also commit an offence if you ‘disturb’ a bat [for example, by interfering with its habitat] or if you damage or destroy a bat’s roost [where they rest and breed].”

If you are selling a property with bats, you must inform your potential buyers. Withholding this information could lead to a claim for compensation later on – if the buyers are unable to renovate the property as they would have liked, for example.

The other issue comes if you wish to carry out building work, as celebrities including musician Noel Gallagher and radio presenter Kelly Brook have recently found.

Having bats doesn’t necessarily mean your renovation plans will be permanently scuppered. Kelly Brook applied to build two bat boxes in the chimney of her Kent home, following an ecology survey, which found long-eared and pipistrelle bats living in the roof.

According to Jack Parker: “Various measures can be used to avoid any impact on bats, such as carrying out work at certain times of year when bats aren’t present; by incorporating bat roosts into the development in question, or by making sure that artificial lighting is designed in a way which does not affect bats.

“Work which would disturb bats may only be carried out with a licence, which will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.”

Read more about this story in the Evening Standard Homes & Property and Property Reporter. For more about bats, visit bats.org.uk .

The Problem with Japanese Knotweed

Posted by

I recently attended a conference at which Richard Snape, a nationally renowned property expert and Consultant and Professional Support Lawyer with Davitt Jones Bould Solicitors, was one of the speakers. Part of his lecture, the substance of which I share here, concerned the issues around Japanese Knotweed. The plant was imported into the UK via Swansea back in the 18th Century. Its use was to reduce landslide but it spread across the counties and over the past 100 years its growth has been quite significant.

Japanese knotweed is a notifiable substance and it is illegal to cause it to be propagated in the wild. Local authorities can take action against property owners, both under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 by the issue of remediation notices and charges for its removal, and under the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime & Policing Act 2014. That piece of legislation gives the local authority power to serve Community Protection Notices on property owners who fail to control their Knotweed.

The presence or otherwise of Japanese knotweed has, therefore become a routine enquiry raised by solicitors during property transactions, not least because it constitutes a contamination substance and infestation of land.

Richard Snape highlighted the problems around knotweed when it comes to a sale. The standard enquiry that is asked as to whether the property is affected by Japanese Knotweed allows the response of ‘Yes’, ‘No’ or ‘Don’t Know’. Richard warned: “‘No’ would be a statement of fact and potentially actionable. ‘Don’t Know’ may be a representation that attempts have been made to investigate. Moreover, the property may be affected by Japanese Knotweed if it is within the neighbourhood. It is suggested that response should be made clear that there has been no attempt to find it.”

There has been some recent litigation involving Japanes knotweed, where claimants have succeeded in recovering damages. In Williams & Waistell v Rail Infrastructure Limited, landowners were awarded damages of £10,000 for lost development potential and possible future damage to property plus £5,000 for remedial work. In Ryb v Conway Consultants damages of £50,000 were awarded against a surveyor who failed to identify the presence of Japanese knotweed in a garden – a lesson to my own profession!

Still, it’s not all bad news. Although Japanese Knotweed is not one of your ‘5 a day’ vegetables, it has been known to be used in the making of gin and apparently, the result is rather good. If you are looking for professional advice on a particular property problem, whether residential or commercial, we would be happy to have a conversation with you to see if we can help. Contact us today!

What is a protected lease?

Posted by

Many business premises are rented on protected tenancies. This offers tenants security of tenure. It means that, in most cases, landlords are obliged to renew the lease when it expires on terms, which are not significantly less favourable than before. Find out what you need to know about protected leases for commercial premises.

Why are commercial leases protected?

If you are running a business, you need the security of knowing that you can continue trading from your premises, even if your lease is close to expiring. You may have been operating for some time from a location that suits you, your customers and suppliers and where you are known well. Having to pack up your business and move premises could be as detrimental to your company as it is inconvenient.

Fortunately, as a business owner, the law in England is one your side. Under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 Part II business leases are protected. This means that most commercial tenants have a statutory right to have their tenancies renewed on expiry.

If you are not able to come to agreeable terms with your landlord, the law gives you the right to apply to the courts to set the new lease terms including a fair market rent based on expert advice.

 

Can a landlord refuse to grant a new lease?

Under the 1954 Act, a landlord can only refuse to grant a new lease to a tenant, who wishes to remain in occupation, on certain grounds. The principal ones are:

· Where a tenant has failed to pay their rent or keep to other conditions of the lease.

· If a landlord wants the property back for his own use or to redevelop it.

· If the landlord offers to provide suitable alternative premises.

· If the property has been divided into smaller, sub-let units and the landlord wishes to let the property as a whole.

Usually, the terms of the new lease can be agreed between landlord and tenant without the need for court proceedings which can be costly.

 

Are there other exceptions?

The landlord and tenant can agree to contract out of a protected lease, if the tenant is willing to do so. In this case, there are certain formalities that need to be complied with.

This situation is most common where the lease relates to part of a building or where the landlord is unsure of his plans and wishes to ensure that he is able to regain possession of

the property without having to pay compensation or establish one of the grounds set out in the Act and avoid potential dispute.

 

What happens at the end of the lease term?

At the end of the term specified in the lease document, the lease continues until either the landlord or the tenant takes steps to end or renew It, which can be done once the lease has no more than12 months left to run. If neither party takes any action, the lease simply continues until either takes the appropriate steps. Whether the landlord or tenant wishes to take action will depend not only on individual circumstances but also strategically on whether rents for similar properties are increasing or decreasing, which makes advice from a surveyor experienced in commercial property so necessary.

 

How do I renew the lease on my business premises?

Once your lease has no more than 12 months left to run, you can serve what is known as a section 26 notice on your landlord, giving not more than 12 nor less than 6 months notice that you require a new lease. This is in a form prescribed by the legislation and includes details of the amount of rent and the length of the new lease you propose. Your landlord has two months to dispute the granting of the new lease, under one of the statutory grounds, or he may suggest alternative terms for a renewal of the lease. If agreement cannot be reached before the proposed renewal date, the matter has to be referred to the court.

 

What can a landlord do?

Once the lease has no more than 12 months left to run, a landlord can bring it to an end by serving a Section 25 notice under the Act using a prescribed form. This gives no more than 12 nor less than 6 months notice of either the fact that the landlord is willing to grant a new lease including his proposals for the length of the new term and the rent or that he is not willing to grant a new term and on which of the statutory grounds he relies. If the landlord opposes the grant of a new lease and the Tenant disputes this, or terms for a new lease cannot be agreed, an application will need to be made to the court.

If a landlord refuses to renew the lease on one of the grounds which is no fault of the tenant – to occupy the property themselves, for example rather than because of a failure to pay rent, then the tenant may be entitled to compensation.

 

How can I find out more?

Renewing a business lease is a complex area and anyone contemplating the process should get professional advice. One of the team of Chartered Surveyors in our Commercial Department would be happy to provide this. Please also contact us to discuss your requirements if you would like help finding commercial premises within the local and surrounding areas.

 

Contact Us

If you have any questions about a protected lease, we would be happy to answer them, please contact us today.

Is Help to Buy costing new homeowners more?

Posted by

The government’s Help to Buy scheme was launched in 2013 to boost housebuilding and help generation rent onto the housing ladder. However, new research shows that people using scheme may actually be paying a premium – and that they may have been able to get on the housing ladder without it.

Conveyancing firm Reallymoving analysed data from 40,000 first-time buyers over the year to September 2019. The researched showed that those using Help to Buy, paid on average 10% more than those who funded their purchases without the scheme. The figure in London was higher at almost 12%, however, in Yorkshire and the West Midlands it was more than 21%.

The study follows the release of figures from housebuilder, Barratt, which revealed that 40% of its business comes from Help to Buy customers.

New builds generally attract a premium price and can subsequently lose value, meaning that first-time buyers using the scheme are at risk of negative equity.

Critics also believe that the popularity of Help to Buy has led developers to inflate prices and that the scheme could have a negative impact on the overall housing market.

Reallymoving chief executive Rob Houghton said: “Most first-time buyers find it difficult to raise a deposit and as a consequence they are being cornered into the new-build sector, where homes already command higher prices, before paying an additional premium on top if they need to use a Help to Buy Equity Loan.

“In many cases they simply don’t have the deposit required to explore other options such as buying a second-hand home, which may offer considerably better value.”

How help to buy works

Opening a Help to Buy ISA means the government will add 25% to the amount saved, up to a maximum of £3,000 on savings of £12,000, if used as a deposit on a first home.

The deposit can be used to buy a property using a Help to Buy: Equity Loan, where the government lends 40% of the cost of a new-build home in London (or 20% elsewhere). The loan is interest free for five years. A Help to Buy: Shared Ownership scheme allows the purchaser to buy a share of the home (between 25% and 75%) and pay rent on the remainder.

Applications for a Help to Buy ISAs close on 30 November this year, and prospective homeowners have been encouraged to open an account now, to ensure they can take advantage of the scheme – including by Money Saving Expert founder, Martin Lewis.

Read more about this story in The Stylist.

What is the difference between freehold and leasehold property?

Posted by

If you are looking at flats in Wimbledon, whether in a new-build development, mansion block or period conversion, they will almost certainly be on the market as leasehold. Most houses in the area, are by contrast sold on a freehold basis.

The owner of a freehold house effectively has full, outright ownership of the house and the land on which it is built. By contrast, a leasehold flat gives the purchaser the right to occupy the property for the amount of time specified in a lease. The overwhelming majority of flats and apartments in London – and England and Wales as a whole – are leasehold. This is because under old land law freehold ownership couldn’t be applied to flats, that were one above the other on a single plot of land.

If you are new to buying property, it is worth finding out more about the differences between leasehold and freehold properties, and some of the key questions to ask before you buy.

What happens when you buy leasehold?

Although leaseholders – also known as lessees – own the property’s internal space, fittings, floor and walls, they do not own the land the flat sits above or the fabric of the building, including the roof and external walls.

Where a flat is in a block, the freeholder – also known as the landlord – is responsible for managing, maintaining and carrying out repairs to the building’s structure, grounds and communal areas, such as staircases, hallways and lifts.

The leaseholder has obligations too, which will be set out in the lease. These may include keeping the flat in good order or behaving in a neighbourly fashion. There may also be restrictions in the lease, such as no pets without the prior consent of the landlord.

 

Questions to ask before you buy leasehold

With leasehold property such a common form of tenure, there is no reason to be put off making a purchase. But there are three important differences between buying leasehold and freehold that you should consider first.

 

1.You need to be aware of the lease length

Lease lengths can vary dramatically, and ownership of a leasehold home will revert back to the freeholder once the lease runs out.

The length of the lease is therefore the first question you should ask about the property before deciding whether it is the one for you.

When buying you should, ideally, be looking for a lease of at least 90 to 125 years, although some new-build properties come with 999-year leases.

Some properties do go on sale with short leases – this may be the reason for a flat appearing to be surprisingly good value for the area.

Be aware that anyone buying a flat with a lease of less than 80 years remaining may find it difficult to obtain a mortgage or to sell the property on, should they wish to.

Under the 1993 Leasehold Reform, Housing & Urban Development Act, however, leaseholders are entitled to a 90-year extension to their lease at a fair market price, if they have owned the property for at least two years. The process is known as leasehold enfranchisement.

If you wish to purchase a property with a short lease, you can make it a condition of the sale that the vendors begin the leasehold enfranchisement process, which you will be able to take forward once the sale goes through.

 

2. You will need to pay ground rent

Ground rent is a fee payable to the landlord on an annual or half-yearly basis. While it is usually a token payment in the range of £50 to £300 a year.

Beware, however since, as has been widely reported in the news, many new-build developments have clauses in their leases, allowing for dramatic increases in ground rent, although the government is looking to curb this practice.

 

3. You will be liable for service charges

To cover the costs of maintaining the fabric of the building and the shared areas of the development, the landlord will impose a service charge.

Fees vary depending on the size and nature of the development and some service charges include contributions to a reserve (or sinking) fund that is used to cover large one-off bills.

 

Whether you opt for a leasehold or freehold property will depend upon the type of home you are looking as well as your budget. Whichever you choose Wimbledon is a sought-after area and a likely wise investment for the future. If you would like more information about buying freehold or leasehold, or to find out about the properties we currently have for sale, please contact us today.

Homeowners warned of property fraud increase

Posted by

In her 2018 bestseller, Our House, Louise Candlish describes the moment when a woman realises an imposter is moving into her London home – and appears to own it. While the book centres around the twists of an elaborate blackmail plot, losing your home to fraud is a real, if small, possibility in 2019.

Research on the website Property Investor Today has revealed that since 2005 property fraud claims submitted to the Land Registry totalled £73.3 million, averaging out at £107,669 per scam. This contrasts to the more common, and heavily publicised, online financial scams, which set the average victim back by £600.

Alarmingly, with so much at stake, property fraud can be quite simple to carry out. Details of ownership of properties in England and Wales can be sourced online and recent cases have involved fraudsters using the homeowner’s identity to secure a mortgage. In other examples, scammers have impersonated the homeowner to have deeds transferred to their name.

Other forms of property fraud include mortgage scams involving fake sellers and holiday homes advertised as properties for sale. So-called ‘Friday afternoon scams’ are also common – with many property transactions taking place on a Friday, hackers intercept solicitors’ emails, sending their own bank details to buyers instead.

According to the HomeOwners Alliance, these types of fraud are on the increase. “Unfortunately, the value of successful frauds of property sales have more than tripled – from £7 million in 2013 to £25 million in 2017,” says chief executive, Paula Higgins.

“Email and IT systems (especially those of conveyancers) are being attacked continuously. Scammers are becoming more sophisticated – fake emails can now be very hard to spot, and people may find themselves caught out, especially when under the stress of buying a home.”

If you are concerned about property fraud, register for free email property alerts from the Land Registry. Using the service means you will be alerted of any attempted activity regarding the deeds of your house.

In addition, for a £40 fee, homeowners can opt to put a restriction on the title deed of their property, stopping the Land Registry from registering a sale or mortgage unless a conveyancer certifies the application is genuine.

For more information about property fraud visit the gov.uk and the HomeOwners Alliance websites.

Andrew Scott Robertson wins The British Property Awards

Posted by

Andrew Scott Robertson, Wimbledon Town have just won The British Property Award for SW19.

Our team performed outstandingly throughout the extensive judging period, which focused on customer service levels.

Andrew Scott Robertson, Wimbledon Town have now been shortlisted for a number of national awards which will be announced later in the year.

The British Property Awards provide agents throughout the UK with an invaluable opportunity to compare the service that they provide against the service provided by their local, regional and national competition.

Agents who go that extra mile and provide outstanding levels of customer service are rewarded with our accolade, which acts as a beacon to highlight these attributes to their local marketplace.

THE BRITISH PROPERTY AWARDS are one of the most inclusive estate agency awards providers as they do not charge to enter. This has enabled their award to be structured in a manner that ensures maximum participation, on average judging over 90% of agents that meet their minimum criteria on a local level.

The Awards team personally mystery shops every estate agent against a set of 25 criteria to obtain a balanced overview of their customer service levels. The judging criteria is periods to ensure that agents have been rigorously and fairly judged.

Robert McLean from The British Property Awards said “Our awards has been specifically designed to be attainable to all agents, removing common barriers to entry, such as cost, to ensure that we have the most inclusive awards. Our award has also been designed to remove any opportunity for bias or manipulation. If an agent has been attributed with one of our awards, it is simply down to the fantastic customer service levels that they have demonstrated across a prolonged period of time. Winning agents should be proud that their customer service levels provide a benchmark for their local, regional and national competition”.

Why location is the key to successful buy-to-let investing

Posted by

We all know location counts when you are looking to buy a family home, but the same is true if you are buying to let. If you are looking in South West London, Wimbledon is a good choice as it will undoubtedly always be popular with tenants.

Wimbledon’s appeal lies in its versatility. Living in Wimbledon gives you all the amenities of the town centre with the rural feel of the village close by. Plus, there are amazing transport links to central London and beyond, as well as plenty of outstanding schools in the state and independent sectors.

Wherever you decide to invest in a buy-to-let property, location is key. As a landlord you’ll be looking for high rental yields, minimal void periods and for your property to gain in value over time. Choosing the best location for your budget can help you achieve this, so before you commit to a property think carefully about how attractive it will be to tenants.

It makes sense to have your ideal tenant in mind when deciding on a location. If your budget will only stretch to smaller apartments, your target market probably isn’t families, where more space is a priority.

If you are looking at young professionals, you’ll probably want a flat that’s close to amenities and night life as well as handy for good transport links. You might also want to consider whether it’s close to a local employer – Wimbledon is close to St George’s Hospital and medical school, for example.

You should do plenty of research about who lives in the area and the average rents they pay. This will help you get a good idea of whether you’ll achieve the return on investment you’re looking for.

To help you decide if a location is right for your buy-to-let project, look at our local area guides. Then use our checklist of what to look out for when choosing your investment.

 

1. Avoid traffic hotspots

Go back a street from the main road – quieter streets with less traffic may hold their value better and are more attractive to tenants.

 

2. Look to the future

Do your research on any planned regeneration schemes in the area and think about the impact on the property you’re considering, good and bad. Will the plans bring better transport links and upgraded facilities, or mean noisy works for years to come that will deter renters?

 

3. How are the schools?

Families are drawn to areas like Wimbledon because of their proximity to good schools. Houses close to outstanding state schools will be popular with renters and retain their value – as long as the schools remain high-performing and popular. If you’re targeting families, do your research into popular schools and where people need to live to secure a place.

 

4. What are the main attractions?

Look at properties with good amenities close by. Attractive parks, bars, restaurants and shops can all make a place appealing to tenants. Wimbledon is well served in this respect, with the common and Wimbledon Park, plus numerous other open spaces. The area also has plenty to do, including New Wimbledon Theatre and a range of amazing places to eat in both the town and village.

Factors like a corner shop or mini supermarket, neighbourhood pub and coffee shop can also give a particular street the edge.

 

5. How is the transport?

This is a crucial one, especially for city professionals looking for an easy commute. Wimbledon may have been planned with commuters in mind, so well is it served for transport, with frequent trains into London Waterloo, Vauxhall and Clapham Junction as well as access to the District Line, Tram, Thameslink and Northern Line services.

 

If you are considering purchasing a buy-to-let property in the Wimbledon area, we’d be happy to discuss the merits different parts of the area and show you some great properties. Contact us today to find out more.

When Wimbledon becomes tennis town

Posted by

 

 

 

 

As the Wimbledon Championships enter their second week, with the nail-biting finals in sight, Wimbledon town and village are at tennis fever pitch. Here are five ways to make the most of the tennis season:

1 You might still get tickets

Official tickets from the All England Club are sold by a ballot, which closed in December. Limited tickets are, however, still available, daily from the Ticketmaster website.

You can also join Wimbledon’s famous queue. The club releases 500 tickets a day for Centre Court, No 1 and No 2 Court – apart from the last four days on Centre Court. Thousands of grounds passes are available daily too, allowing access to unreserved seating and standing on Courts No 3 to 18. Arrive as early as possible and before the ground opens at 10.30am.

Read more on the Wimbledon website.

2 Watch the final on a big screen

Queuing for a grounds pass allows you to watch the action from the big screen on Murray Mound, the piece of land to the north of Centre Court.

Or head for the Piazza in Wimbledon town centre, where the atmosphere is possibly just as good. If you’re early and very lucky you might bag a deckchair or an outdoor table at a local restaurant.

Alternatively, go further afield where there are big screens at Granary Square, Kings Cross; beside Tower Bridge and City Hall; in the grounds of Fulham Palace or at St Katharine Dock.

Find more options on the Time Out website.

Wimbledon

3 Soak up the atmosphere

Shops and businesses in the town and village go all out to make the most of a time when the eyes of the world are on Wimbledon. Check out the amazing shop front displays and post pictures of your favourites on Instagram or go tennis-related celebrity spotting from local cafes and restaurants.

4 Dress to impress, or not

If you’re heading to the tournament, unless you’re competing, there’s no dress code. In spite of the glamour of Wimbledon, for spectators it’s all about comfortable and casual. During the first week of play temperatures soared. Forecasts for the second week are cooler with a chance of rain, so wear layers and come prepared for sunshine and showers.

5 Can I bring a picnic?

There are plenty of places to eat inside the ground, but they aren’t cheap and it’s likely you’ll need to queue – so bringing your own picnic is a good option. You can only take in one bag per person, measuring no more than 40 x 30 x 30cm, so no hard-sided picnic hampers or cool boxes are allowed.

If you wish to sell or let your property in Wimbledon, then please contact us for more information on how we can help your journey to #TennisTown

Ten steps to becoming the tenant that landlords love

Posted by

 

 

 

 

If you are new to renting, there are a few things you need to know about your responsibilities as a tenant – ten, in fact!

While a difficult landlord is every renter’s worst fear, the relationship works both ways and tenants can be big trouble too. More often than not, problems occur because of a lack of communication, which lets minor issues escalate, creating a difficult situation.

A good landlord/tenant relationship is great for everyone. As a tenant you may find your landlord eager to respond when there’s an issue and happy to keep you in the property for as long as you wish. The landlord will also benefit from a longer-term tenant, who will look after the place.

If you’re new to renting, there are a few responsibilities in your tenancy agreement that you really need to know about, from being on time with your rent to getting on with the neighbour. Read on for our ultimate guide to becoming the tenant that landlords love.

 

1. Always pay your rent on time

Your number one duty as a tenant is to pay your rent on time. If you pay by standing order, make sure you have funds to cover your rent on the due date. If you fail to pay, your landlord can take steps to evict you and reclaim the money that’s owed. You need to make sure you pay any other charges, as agreed with your landlord too – council tax or utility bills, for example.

 

2. Look after your home

It’s generally a condition of your shorthold tenancy agreement that you keep the property in good order.

While your landlord is responsible for carrying out repairs to the structure, plumbing, electrics and heating, you’ll be expected to complete small tasks to keep your home running smoothly – checking smoke alarms, changing lightbulbs and keeping the place well-ventilated, to prevent damp.

While not everyone is a Mrs Hinch, you’ll need to keep your home clean and tidy, and take reasonable steps to prevent problems occurring – not flushing wipes down the loo and turning off the water at the mains if you’re away in cold weather.

Always report repairs to your landlord promptly – small damp patches could become a big deal if not treated. If further damage is caused because a problem wasn’t fixed, you could be liable.

 

landlord

 

3. Allow your landlord access

Unless living in the property, landlords don’t have the right to come and go as they please. Your landlord must give you at least 24-hours’ notice before visiting and should visit at a reasonable time, apart from in an emergency.

You do need to allow them access, however, to carry out repairs and maintenance and to make fire and gas safety checks. It’s in your interest to be as accommodating as possible – being flexible, by offering a choice of dates and times, will help you to a good relationship and make sure repairs are completed in a timely fashion.

 

4. Don’t make alterations without permission.

Rental properties tend to be decorated in neutral tones, which suit most tastes. Avoid the temptation to personalise your space with something more radical. Unauthorised redecorating, or drilling holes to hang pictures, is likely to result in the landlord withholding your security deposit, so they can make good after you’ve gone.

 

5. Don’t sublet

Subletting happens when an existing tenant lets part or all of a property they rent to another person. There are genuine reasons why it might suit you to sublet. You may be struggling to pay the rent alone or need to be away from home for a short period but want to make sure the rent is covered. If you have a good reason, your landlord is likely to be sympathetic, but will want it all made official so you must get their permission first.

 

neighbours

 

6. Be a good neighbour

Your behaviour in the property reflects on your landlord, so don’t create a nuisance. Keep your music to a reasonable volume and avoid noisy parties. Make sure you put your rubbish and recycling out on time and keep the outside of the property tidy – check your responsibilities around gardening in your tenancy agreement. Landlords can start eviction proceedings against tenants for antisocial behaviour caused to neighbours. As a tenant you will be held responsible for the actions of anyone visiting you too.

 

7. Communicate with your landlord

Try to respond to texts, calls and emails as soon as possible and be helpful. Keeping the lines of communication open will help your relationship long-term.

 

8. Ask before getting a pet

Some landlords allow cats and dogs, others don’t. While some people are relaxed about animals, others are concerned about damage to furnishings, annoyance to neighbours and smells. If the property is a flat, there may be a clause in the Landlord’s own lease that prevents anyone from keeping animals. If you have a pet, or are thinking of getting one, always check your tenancy agreement and get permission in writing before bringing home a furry friend.

 

9. Let your landlord know if you’re going away

If you ‘re going to be away from your home for a substantial period – because you’re in hospital, travelling abroad or caring for a relative – let your landlord know. You’ll still need to pay rent while you’re away unless you come to some arrangement with your landlord or sublet with permission.

When going on holiday, or away from the property for a short time, it’s also good practice to let you landlord know and to give their details to a neighbour in case there’s an emergency while you’re away.

 

10. Saying goodbye

You should end your tenancy properly by giving the correct notice. If you don’t you will still be liable to pay rent. You can’t give notice if you are still in the fixed term of a tenancy, unless your tenancy agreement says otherwise.

 

If you are looking for somewhere to rent in Wimbledon area contact us today to find out more about our selection of rental properties.

24 High Street,
Wimbledon Village,
London SW19 5DX

Tel: +44 (0)20 8971 6780
Fax: +44 (0)20 8946 3683